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Zuzu's Petals Cowl

This pattern is called Zuzu's Petals (available from Ravelry). This is the second cowl that I have knit from the pattern. The first was knit using a fingering yarn. This was knit using a lovely DK weight yarn that I bought last year at the Vashon Island Pharmacy during our annual quilting retreat. The yarn is luscious; springy and made of 70% merino and 30% silk fiber. This is 'my' color - the one that I always look for and seldom find. I'd been saving it and decided that I really needed to use it for something!

Unfortunately, in searching the web I am no longer able to find any more of this yarn for sale. It's from Russi Sales distributors in Bellingham, Washington. They are a wholesale only concern so I don't expect that calling them wanting to buy more would help!

This is the first time that I have tried using these new interlocking blocking boards that DH gave to me for the holidays. I have had the large size, black felt covered, blocking board for many years, but with it's heft and large size, it was becoming cumbersome  to tote out for smaller projects. I was initially a bit leery about these boards, wondering if they would hold up to the repeated use of blocking pins. Turns out I had no worries. They are made of dense foam and will last a long time. They are 12" interlocking squares, so it was wonderful to have a small, but sufficient, area to block this on, and it was easy (and lightweight!) to move it closer to the heat for faster drying.

Next on the needles? The "Little Iris" Shawl  designed by Anne Hanson for Kollage yarns. I'm using my favorite Malabrigo sock yarn in Abril purchased at my favorite LYS, Island Wools.. It's an unusual color for me to use - purples and blues! The pattern is  a bit more of a challenge for me, but I'm liking it so far. I have a lot of art to do - fabric type things for a change ! Tomorrow I will begin to catch up on those projects. I'm itching for the sewing machine now!

Comments

  1. Call them. You might be surprised. If nothing else maybe they can point you in the direction of a store who might have some. The worse they can do is say 'no' and you are where you started from. They might say yes and you get your yarn.

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