Skip to main content

Bundle Eco-Dying A La India Flint's Stuff, Steep, and Store Method

I have been waiting all summer to be able to get down those few steps to my house so that I could gather some plant materials for some eco dying a la India Flint's "Stuff, Steep and Store" methods. Finally, over the weekend, I was up doing a bit of plant gathering, and with surgery just a week or so away, I wanted make haste while the sun shines so-to-speak!

For those of you who may not have heard of India Flint before she is the queen pin of all things bundle dye (my hero of natural dyes is Jenny Dean). Bundle dying is, I believe, more unique, to India.

There are many ways to learn more about Ms. Flint. Her blog, The Prophet of Bloom" is a delight:

You can find her on FaceBook at:

My first awareness of India Flint's work was thanks to my friend Janet, the knower of all things. I love India's book on bundle dyeing, named aptly enough, Eco-Color:

Her two most recent books are both self published through Blurb. The one that I used for this "canning" method of dying is from her  48 page offering entitled "Stuff, Steep and Store". It contains a lot of images as well as the salient points of this method, which is genius in its simplicity.

Her most recent  Blurb book is also a short 50 pages and is described as a "... pocket guide to eco-print bundling..."


This method uses your "normal" canning tools to process your plant dyes. Here I have some cottons (pre-mordanted in soda ash) and silks (pre-mordanted in white and apple vinegars). I collected horsetail, ferns, maple leaves, peppermint, dandelions, comfrey, and blackberry leaves from the yard, and I used bits of metal added to the water. The hardest part will be seeing how long I can make it before I unlock the surprises lurking in these jars.  I have some more ideas that I want to try, and am looking forward to some autumn leaves.
 Here you can already see how the blackberry leaves are printing beautifully. This makes me think that I should have added fewer leaves to the fabric because they look (or I think they look) so nice each leaf by itself!
Here is a maple leaf peeking out already. Rich promises emerging from the murk!

Comments

  1. I can't wait for the 'uncanning' myself!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love how the canning jars look so filled with promise. They take me back to Gram's root cellar and the rows upon rows of color waiting for winter dinners. I will have to re-think my decision to stay away from eco dyeing. :) Have a beautiful day!

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Share your thoughts! Thank you for taking the time to stop by!

Popular posts from this blog

Circular Knitting Needle Comparison

When I use something a lot I have to admit that I try to find the brand that works best for me. I never thought that I would ever be a scissor snob until I found Dovo brand scissors and, of course I love my trusty Fiskars too. I became a scissor snob thank to Dovo. 
Now I seem to be searching for the perfect knitting needles - the perfect one for me at least. I have been enjoying the 'chase' and I think I am close to knowing exactly what my preference is, and want, in a knitting needles. 
I only use circular knitting needles. When I first taught myself to knit myself  that's what I used and my preference has not changed. I began knitting with Addi Turbo needles. That is the brand that my LYS sold and I have always loved how slick and fast they are. I have sets of Addi clicks interchangeables in both lace and regular.  Over time, I have discovered what I want in a knitting needle: metal, the pointiest tip possible, a fast knitting, slick, metal needle and a very flexible c…

Fabric Stiffeners and Hardeners For All Occasions Plus A Recipe For Home Made Starch Alternative

I have had to become better acquainted with various ways to harden, stiffen or prevent fraying in cloth lately. It has been an enlightening journey, and I thought that I would pass it along the lessons that I have learned about a variety of excellent products that suit any need to 'tame' fabric for a variety of reasons. 
Fray Check. Who among us has not used this ubiquitous little potion over the years? It works like a charm to 'glue' up those raw edges on some of the most beautiful fabrics I use; ensuring that I can sew the fabric without fear of endless unraveling. This product has remained a favorite since I first discovered it many years ago. The only change that I think Prym/Dritz has made to it over the years is a finer application tip.
I have re-discovered my admiration for this product as I was making a holiday gift from some beautiful cotton that was especially prone to fraying! I have also recently learned that Fray Check can be removed with rubbing alcohol.…

Thread Matters and Easter Joy

My enchantmnt with embroidery continues unabated. Who knew?! I recently finished this 14" square; my interpretation of a pattern from Kathy Schmitz' book "Stitches From The Garden". She has another new book coming out soon called "Stitches For The Yuletide". I like her books because the designs can so easily be made your own. I have been working on some original designs (my own) lately and am looking forward to trying one of them soon. For quite a few years now I have been a fan of Wonderfil threads. My delight began innocently enough when I tried their luscious cotton thread called Konfetti. It's a 50 wt and is comparable to Superior Threads Masterpiece 50 wt cotton and Aurifil 50wt cotton, Konfetti has a lustrous, silky feel. For the record, I am also a fan of Masterpiece and Aurifil threads, but Wonderfil has developed some really unique thread lines and I cannot help jumping on their fan-wagon. I think that they have a unique line up of threads w…